Beautiful Savage Magazine & Gallery Rene Mele Present


An exhibition of contemporary sculpture, curated by Daine Coppola
Opening Reception: March 6, 2015 6-9pm,
Ian Carr, Ryan Frank, Liliya Lifanova, Kyu Seok Oh, Matthew Stone

Feb. 18, 2015 – NEW YORK – Gallery Rene Mele and Beautiful Savage Magazine
have the pleasure of presenting “Future Origins,” a group exhibition of contemporary sculpture.

I once asked Robert Rauschenberg how he thought art history would have unfolded without Marcel Duchamp’s influence. In his fatherly voice, he replied: “Yes, Duchamp helped to bridge the past with the contemporary, and he also pushed us to produce art in ways that had never been made before.” By Duchamp’s bidding, young artists in the 1950’s and 1960’s shined new light upon ostensibly worthless objects, transforming them into what the language of the modern urban men christened “contemporary art.” **  Stepping away from the sleek and slick works of art offered to collectors in the fancy showrooms of galleries and auction-houses, a new generation of contemporary artists bend, shape, and polish, and transform ideas into objects that ask to be recognized. “Future Origins” was curated by Daine Coppola with an emphasis on art that eschews the corruptive influence of museum and market. 

Liliya Lifanova’s “Torn” series plots sex and violence against a struggle for abstraction in a manner which broaches notions of self-identity and the cultural memory of a political system destroying itself from within. Though varying in material, her works are rooted in the formal traditions of painting and drawing.

The work of Ian Carr is a contemporary spin-off of the Constructivist tradition, his formal aesthetics rooted in architecture and design. His assemblage of welded steel, wood, glass and other industrial materials produces a minimal yet aggressively angular abstraction. The forms often bear a strong relationship to, and sometimes a direct reflection of architecture, weaponry, machinery, thus putting their overwhelming presence and iconic qualities in society on display.

The works of Matthew Stone are constructed with polyurethane foam, spandex, resin and acrylic paint forming an organic and exotic flora. Bringing light to the conflict between the human desire for control and the rhythm of natural processes, the exquisite colors and shapes that Stone’s works around these objects resemble the flora only found in a sci-fi world or aquatic plants in a unknown sea.

Ryan Frank blurs boundaries between sculpture, photography and performance with his handsomely finished wooden boxes—eclectic, Judd-ian sculptures which house photographic images portraying a specific time and place. Frank’s objects are experienced through physical movement and vision in tandem, creating a dance-like ritual between viewer and object.

** (From a conversation with Robert Rauschenberg and Rene Melchor, Paris 2002)